FREE UK Delivery | Long Shelf-life On Everything

Piano Coffee Blog RSS



Five Facts About The Unique Coffee Culture of Naples

It is said that the Neapolitans drink more coffee and have more coffee bars per square kilometre than any other Italian region. Introduced locally by the Habsburg Queen Maria Carolina in the eighteenth century, Neapolitan coffee culture has evolved along its own unique path. Here are five of the many interesting aspects of Neapolitan coffee culture. Miscela The Neapolitan blend or ‘miscela’ has unique characteristics which differentiate it from Italian coffee. Using different origins of bean and roasting longer, Neapolitan coffee is bolder in flavour and higher in caffeine delivering a thick ‘cremina’ (as opposed to the ‘crema’ of Italian-style blends). Volete Un Caffè ? If you are offered a coffee in Naples, it’s considered rude to refuse.  Traditionally prepared...

Continue reading



Kimbo Il Caffè Di Napoli

Whilst the north of Italy is home to a number of competing brands, south of Rome, in the Mezzogiorno, one coffee roaster dominates: Kimbo. Northern blends reflect the influence of the coffee culture of the old Austro-Hungarian empire. Caffè Kimbo has an altogether more exotic heritage which looks south across the Mediterranean for its inspiration. Italian coffee has extended its influence across the globe and the jewel in that cultural crown can be found in Napoli. Neapolitan coffee is distinct from its mainstream Italian counterpart in two key ways: The famous Neapolitan Roast is darker The Miscella (or blend) comprises beans from different origins These two factors combine to produce an intense, complex, spicy espresso with a very thick cremina....

Continue reading




Matthew Fort: Coffee cocktails beyond the Espresso Martini

There was a moment over Christmas when I thought I was hallucinating. It was as if I’d stumbled across a hairy mammoth in St James’s Park. I was presented with an Irish coffee. You know, the proto-Bailey’s Irish Cream - coffee, whiskey, sugar with whipped cream floating on top. It looks like a Guinness but doesn’t taste like Guinness. There’s some debate as to when, how and by whom it came to be invented (some dispute as to whether it was first created in Ireland at all, but in America), but it became the sophisticated way of relaxing at the end of dinner. It first put in an appearance in the 1950s and became really quite fashionable by the 1980s,...

Continue reading



Matthew Fort: Ode to olive oil

"The new season’s olive oil from my brother Johnny’s smallholding in the Monte Lucretili, the hills above Rome. To my mind, it is the finest olive oil ever produced - lucent, lambent, potent but elegant, muscular but refined."

Continue reading